In the Garden

I have this little piece of paradise. It happens to be in my very own backyard. It is so peaceful and calm- in the middle of the Suburban west. Slug destruction aside, this is a quiet little delicious sanctuary that I take pride in every time I clip a leaf of kale for salad or pull a carrot fresh from the soil.

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Sweet Tooth

Our house has always embraced the old fashioned, outdated qualities that slow living provides.  I love technology in so many ways, but really admire the classics and the quality and pride of making something for yourself.

I recently had an ice cream making experience with my favorite ginger that was so successful we were trying to figure out ways to bring the “left overs” home more than a few hours away. Afterwards,  I scoured the web for my own little piece of ice cream history.  I found my very own antique maker thanks to In the Top Drawer via etsy.  After gathering my favorite (and locally sourced) ingredients, we were on to our frozen kitchen adventure.

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The Must Have:

    • Plenty of Ice & Salt for the bucket
    • 1 1/2 Cup half & half
    • 4 egg yolks
    • 1 Cup sugar
    • 1 1/2 Cup heavy whipping cream
    • FLAVOR: Fresh Strawberries (you can really add anything here

 The How To:

1. Heat the half & half in a sauce pan over low heat.

2. In a separate bowl, mix the egg yolks and sugar.

3. Slowly add the egg and sugar mixture into the saucepan.

4.Continue to cook on low heat, stirring frequently, until the mixture thickens slightly and coats the back of a spoon.

5. Add heavy whipping cream to the  mixture.

6. Pour everything into the metal canister and secure the lid.

7. Insert canister into bucket, surround with crushed ice, add salt, and crank it for almost 30 minutes or until there is resistance in the cream.

8. Pour into a freezer safe container and freeze over night.

9. Scoop and enjoy- even for breakfast.

 

Craft it up

I am back after a short blogging break- Some news, share a bit of love hit over 1,500 followers this week! If you are one of them, thanks for reading!

I started this as a photography blog a few years ago, and it has become a creative outlet that I want to continue to grow.  I promise to bring: photography of families, pets, nature, tutorials for DIY projects, continued photos of my adventures and recipes to share!

Today brings a tutorial for Craft Paper printing.

I have a YUDU machine, and have found it difficult to find the emulsion and patience needed to continue to use it.  I love the craft, but it shouldn’t have that many steps.  Freezer paper has changed all of that.  I no longer need my screen printer unless I plan to make mass quantities of my project.

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Someone dear to me is having a baby in the coming weeks, and I thought I would treat her to a few homemade items for the little girl who is about to win the hearts of many. I always start with onesies.  They are the uniform of children everywhere. They are easy to clean, easy to pack, easy to make adorable.

You will Need:

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  • Your printer
  • Freezer Paper (cut to 8×11)
  • An Iron
  • An X-Acto knife
  • Fabric paint in your choice of color(s)
  • A foam or fabric brush
  • A Onsie

1. Print your desired design from your computer. Remember what you cut out is what will be screened to the onesie.

2. Cut out the design with your X-Acto knife. If you have a cutting mat, use it. If not, use thick cardboard to prevent damage to surfaces. Remember if you have letting with hollow middles (like A, D, R) to save the middles to add to the design as part of the stencil. shareabitoflove2

3. Iron the stencil directly to the onesie to be sure that all edges are secure.shareabitoflove3

4. Paint with medium coverage over the stencil. You can use two different colors if you don’t plan to mix.

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5. Let dry. When fully dried, peel off the stencil.  If your fabric paint requires ironing to set the paint, follow the regular directions. And Tada, have a glass of wine and think of adorable ways to wrap this homemade gift.

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Easy DIY Apron

I cook a lot. You probably already know that from the many food themed blogs of the last few years.  Cooking a lot = lots of messes. Sometimes those messes end up on your favorite shirt and you find the need for an apron.

I’ve had this round table cloth- hanging out around the house for some time now. It was time it was put to good use.  I don’t have a round table and its clearly too small to make curtains.  Thanks to Martha, I found the right basic pattern to make even more simple. No pockets necessary for this gal, so I forgot all about the need to fold, add a couple extra seams, and just cut the entire pattern up about 6 inches. This made a plain front apron that hit me about the knees.

Cut out your pattern, alter as needed. Pin to ironed fabric. Cut to pattern. With a little ironing turning a hem that is about 1/2 inch wide. Turn again another 1/2 inch on all sides and iron. Sew each seam. Make you waist and neck straps in the same fashion. Attach and VIOLA! Apron City. No more splashes on my clothes any more.

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The Blue Octopus- Sips-n-Canvas

Hi, my name is Monica. I am a craftaholic.

I certainly can’t decide which skills I would like to hone in on in the craft world, so I’ve decided to dabble in them all- and I mean ALL. This week’s adventure brought me to The Blue Octopus in Tacoma, Washington.  My dear friend over at Mary Jo Photography recommended this adventure thanks to a quick snag of a Living Social deal.  I am so glad she did. This is soley a blog about my super excitement about the entire experience. So. Much. Fun.

Walking into the studio space- The Saint Helens Ave Mercantile, you will find a creative co-op run by 4 fabulous and entrepreneurial women.   Located there is the OCD Candy Company, The Tea Works, Wolf Bear Treasures & Orcal Card Reader- Gail Scott, and of course The Blue Octopus. It is filled will all things lovely, creative, and a bit eclectic. Something for everyone really. The painting class is taught by Kerry Cole, who quit corporate job permanently a few years ago to get fully immersed in her art. Luckily for her students and the community, she did.  Her art covers the walls and can be felt in every speck of paint on the tables.  Every piece feels like it is personal and has a story.

The Sips-N-Canvas class is an opportunity for those interested in painting to dabble (stipple) their way into the paint media.  Kerry starts everyone off by having them choose an image that speaks to them.  She gets you all the supplies and techniques needed to create a masterpiece including cheese, crackers, and wine. of course wine. During the two hour class, she is patient, knowledgeable and SO encouraging.

This was one of the best guided art experiences I’ve had in a while, and would highly recommend Kerry’s classes to anyone interested in painting.  Her art is for sale on etsy, in her shop, and at exhibits. Her painting classes are open to everyone, and she even offers private parties. Who’s in?

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